New porn-related Bitcoin scam gathers $1 million from frightened victims

bitcoin scammer
New porn-related Bitcoin scam gathers $1 million from frightened victims
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According to The Next Web, a new report has come out stating that Bitcoin scammers have gathered around $1 million in the first cryptocurrency by convincing porn viewers that there is footage of them masturbating.

A targeted attack

That’s right, this scam targets frequent porn watchers. It goes after them via email, saying that not only pictures of them masturbating, but what they’re watching, will be sent to their contact lists if they don’t pay up in Bitcoin. It’s a typical scam, only now it involves cryptocurrency instead of traditional fiat.

It’s no surprise that this would work either. Not many people are as aware of scams as common computer users are. Those are the targets who would fall for this, and oh they have.

Of course, these scammers don’t actually have any photographs, nor do they know what type of porn you watch. But, according to a report from Area 1, a cybersecurity firm, they’ve gathered around $949,000 from doing so. They got this number from the blockchain record that associates with the wallet address. Remeber, this isn’t your normal form of online trading.

The scam isn’t entirely random, either. As Fortune reports, sometimes these scammers will use a previously leaked password of yours to get your attention. They’ll show this and try to prove that they have all of your information. That’s hard to disagree with. But, it’s more likely they got this data from a random password leak over the past few years.

As the publication reports, you should heed the following instructions to see if your information has leaked:

“[you should] check to see whether any accounts tied to that password appear in Have I Been Pwned, a searchable database that identifies what personal information of yours may have leaked as a result of various online breaches. If any accounts that once used that password pop up, then the extortionist likely scraped all of the information from one of these data dumps. Translation: The crook has not been monitoring your every keyboard touch, screenshot, and webcam image. Rather, the delinquent is bluffing—frightening unsuspecting victims into forking over cryptocurrency.”

Now, let’s keep sharing this news so people know it’s a scam. That way, these scammers will have to learn how to buy cryptocurrency the traditional way.

About Max Moeller

Cryptocurrency and games writer. Looking to the future by studying how these two industries can blend. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maxwell-moeller-912044b4/